February 21st, 2011

Rose-Bay

2011 Rose & Bay Awards update on voting

The Rose & Bay Awards honor excellence in cyberfunded creativity.  If you're new to this project, please read more on the 2011 landing page.

We're nearing the end of the voting period.  All voting polls are open and showing activity:
Art: 53 voters
Fiction: 270 voters
Poetry: 22 voters
Webcomic: 245 voters
Other Project: 53 voters
Patron: 26 voters

2011 Nominee badges are available for all six categories, thanks to [info]karen_wehrstein.

Please continue to promote the 2011 Rose & Bay Awards, reminding people that the voting period is nearing its end.  The more participants, the better!  If you haven't voted, please do so.  You don't want to run out of time at the last minute.  We appreciate all the signal boosts and votes so far!</span>
Leaf

Drakeathon Aftermath Report*

Xposted to my lj, my dreamwidth, and the Dreamwidth Crowdfunding community.

* title changed to indicate that no, kitty is still alive and well.


This weekend was my Drakeathon: an 8-hour livewriting marathon over two days to raise funds to help offset the costs of my diabetic kitty's insulin, needles, and vet visits.

For 4 hours on Saturday & 4 on Sunday, I took prompts and wrote from them in a GoogleDoc open to anyone who donated.

I received $155 in donations, got 20 prompts from 16 people, 13 of whom donated.

(in sick kitty terms, this is one bottle of insulin and 100 syringes, or 6 visits to the vet, or 155 days of canned cat food).

Things I learned:
* I like livewriting. I really like it. If I could do all my writing in front of an audience, I think I would.
* GoogleDocs works, but it has its flaws. It's not right there visible to everyone, which I think might draw more interest.
* (Something I knew already, but I'm not sure how to capitalize on best): Interest makes interest. If half of your Twitter Feed or F-list is talking about something, you're more likely to be interested yourself.
* 4 hours at a sitting is too long, and midnight is too late.

Things that surprised me:
* I got less unpaid prompts (5, from 3 people) and more paid prompts (the other 15) than I thought I would. I expected a lot more little 50 or 100 word unpaid prompts and less 600+ word paid requests
* I write slower than I thought I would. I still have 2 unpaid & 4 paid requests to write in the next week, totally 3900 words (I wrote ~7000 words over 8 hours).
* People seem rather interested in what sort of pizza I'll be getting with the $20 incentive level (probably take-out Indian. There's no good delivery in East Nowhere where we live)
* It probably shouldn't have surprised me, but I had quite a few Addergoole prompts (4, plus two in the wings that are "Addergoole /or/ Cali;" Addergoole is my webserial I've been posting for 2+ years) and none for the current fantasy short story setting, Reiassan.


All in all, I had a lot of fun. I'm excited to put together the e-book, as that will be another learning experience, and I will probably do this again at some point.
neutral

Crowdfunded Documentary: "The Sunrise People"

I'm a big fan of nonfiction crowdfunding, especially news -- it's a terrific way to get around the corporate-owned media.  Check out The Sunrise People over on Kickstarter. 

The Sunrise People is a 30-minute documentary that tells the story of the Atakapa-Ishak through the eyes of the Philippe family. The film tracks Rosina Philippe's exploration of the importance of place with regard to her culture, as well as the devastating effects of the BP oil disaster and the history of oil extraction in the Gulf Coast, which is threatening the environment and the survival of her people and culture.
Sadly I am brokeass broke this week, but I will do what I can by boosting the signal for this project. I remember reading earlier that, of all the people who got shafted by the BP disaster, the tribal people living along the coast got hit extra hard. (The authorities just wanted to run them off their land. Again.) So I would really like to see this documentary explore history-in-action down there. This is what journalism is really all about, or should be.  Please help by pitching in or at least passing the word.